Dorrance Publishing Company Publishing, Co. Inc. Est. 1920 Thu, 15 Apr 2021 12:09:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.4 /wp-content/uploads/2021/01/cropped-dorrancepublishing-logo-32x32.png Dorrance Publishing Company 32 32 Show Don’t Tell: Tension /show-dont-tell-tension/ Thu, 15 Apr 2021 14:00:42 +0000 /?p=4624 You’re sitting at a local coffee shop, waiting for your friend to arrive. You sip peacefully on your coffee, across from you sits your friend’s cup which you bought for… Show Don’t Tell: Tension

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You’re sitting at a local coffee shop, waiting for your friend to arrive. You sip peacefully on your coffee, across from you sits your friend’s cup which you bought for them to surprise them. Suddenly the door to the coffee shop is open more forcefully than you’d expect for the clientele of such a quaint little place. Your friend walks in, looking around with a slight frown on their face until they spot you and begin to head over. You immediately notice their hands which are balled into fists at their side. They take a seat with a soft ‘hey’ in your direction and begin drinking their coffee without another word. You can feel their foot tapping beneath the table and their jaw is clenched tightly. You ask how they’re doing and they give you a curt ‘fine’ back. It’s pretty obvious that something is bothering them, something that they’re clearly bottling up.

Tension specifically involves a character attempting to hold in their feelings and battle through them inwardly, rather than getting an emotional release. The emotional release will need to happen in order for the tension to pay off, but the more you build up the tension the better that release will feel for your readers. Writing tension should make your readers feel… well, tense. Here are some tips on how to show rather than tell your readers about different kinds of tension throughout your manuscript.

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1) Anger

One form of tension that a character may experience is through anger. Perhaps their friend said something derogatory about their sibling and, though they weren’t brave enough to say anything at the time, the anger is still within them, festering. It may be tempting to simply write ‘[INSERT CHARACTER NAME HERE] is feeling tension because they’re upset.’ but that’s lazy writing. Instead, write about how their leg begins shaking once their friend walks through the door. Write about how their jaw clenches when their friend speaks. Write about how they look down or straight ahead when they address their friend, instead of looking at them directly. Write about how their responses are curt instead of talkative like normal. All of these actions show rather than tell the reader that there is tension between two characters, in the form of anger.

2) Nerves

Another form of tension that can occur for a character is through nerves. A character can react to nervousness by becoming tense and rigid. Let’s say a character who adores theater has a big musical audition coming up after school. Throughout the day, that character may sit with their posture rigid as they bite their nails. They may pick at a piece of their sweatshirt, slowly unraveling the fabric by a single thread. They could clench their fists only to quickly dart out of class, run to the bathroom, and vomit in the toilet.

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3) Affection

Tension can also exist between two characters who are romantically involved with one another. This form of tension can be shown through the characters sitting close together, their hands almost touching but not quite. Or perhaps one character says something a little too personally revealing, so they blush and rub their hand behind their neck. Maybe they’re forced to work together on a project, they’re bouncing ideas off of each other excitedly when one of them drops a pen and they both bend down to reach for it, then look at each other embarrassed.

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4) Long Build-up

Build-up involves a form of tension that comes from long unresolved feelings. This is something readers would notice over the course of an entire book. Perhaps there’s a character who is constantly being teased by another character (let’s call them character A and B). At first, you see that character A is able to bounce back easily from character B’s teasing. Character A is a very sweet easy-going person and they let the teasing roll right off of their shoulders, smiling along with the joke.

As the book goes on, however, you start to see their attitude change. Perhaps they snap back once after a joke, or maybe they’re frowning slightly after a particular joke. But as the story progresses, their reactions become more pronounced until suddenly they’re walking around frowning, clenching their jaw, and snapping at people all the time. This example allows readers to see how certain types of unresolved feelings can create tension if they happen over a longer period of time.

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Locations in Literature: Bath, England /locations-in-literature-bath-england/ Fri, 09 Apr 2021 14:06:56 +0000 /?p=4614 “Oh, who can ever be tired of Bath?” asked the protagonist of Northanger Abbey, a novel by famous classic Jane Austen. It was also the very same city that… Locations in Literature: Bath, England

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“Oh, who can ever be tired of Bath?” asked the protagonist of Northanger Abbey, a novel by famous classic Jane Austen. It was also the very same city that helped inspire her novel Persuasion and one where Austen herself lived with her family for a time. The town of Bath was a bustling city of aristocrats who visited the town to show off their fashion sense, socialize with other families, and to enjoy the health benefits of sulfur baths. Add the fact that the city is a hub for Roman history, healing hot springs, and Georgian architecture and it’s no wonder Austen chose the city as the setting and inspiration for two of her novels.

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The history of this city begins with the Romans who would use the city for its hot springs, which were an extremely important part of Roman life. Not only were these hot springs a center for healing and cleanliness, but they were also used for entertainment and worship. They were even used as places to serve food and alcoholic drinks on special occasions.

During the Middle Ages, Bath was used as a center for wool production and milling. This was fairly common for western England at the time as wool had become the most common textile used to make clothing.

Although the baths or hot springs were still around during this period, they weren’t well maintained. However, throughout the town’s history, the baths themselves were believed to have health and healing benefits (even to this day). Whether you were bathing in or drinking the sulfurous waters, they were said to have been the cure of nerves, gout, etc.

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Jane Austen made her stay in Bath from 1801-1806, though she had previously stayed in the city for a month. The family’s stay in the city was a plan of retirement for her father, who ended up dying during their stay in January of 1805. The family remained in the city for roughly a year after her father’s death, before leaving the city of Bath in the summer of 1806. Although it was clearly a major source of inspiration for the writing, she wasn’t exactly happy during her stay. Later after leaving the city, she wrote to her sister Cassandra stating, “It will be two years tomorrow since we left Bath for Clifton, with what happy feelings of escape.”

On the same subject, Margaret Ward of The Irish Times wrote, “Although Austen enjoyed her early visits to Bath she was not at all happy when her father moved the family there, and she often satirized its social scene of balls, promenades and assemblies.” When they first moved to Bath, Austen and her family stayed on Gay Street which is located near the center of the city. However, they later took up in less luxurious lodgings as the family’s financial situation had declined. This was a theme that pervaded in one of the novels that the city inspired, Persuasion.

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Although Austen herself may not have loved her time there, it did provide the perfect place of inspiration for her writing. It was a town entirely devoted to socializing pursuits and creating arrangements such as marriages- subject matter that Austen herself was most adept at crafting in her own writing.

The town of Bath continues to tout its relationship with Jane Austen to this day, holding events in her honor such as the Jane Austen Ball and the Jane Austen Festival, both of which encourage patrons to come dressed in 19th century period costumes.

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Writing Prompt: Caught in the Rain /writing-prompt-caught-in-the-rain/ Fri, 02 Apr 2021 14:23:37 +0000 /?p=4598 Take a minute, close your eyes, and think about all of the cinematic moments that happen in the rain. There are incredible action sequences where the rain obscures the vision… Writing Prompt: Caught in the Rain

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Take a minute, close your eyes, and think about all of the cinematic moments that happen in the rain. There are incredible action sequences where the rain obscures the vision of the protagonist as they kick up water and their blood mixed in with the rain on the ground. There are meet-cutes where a character who is already having a rough day gets caught in a horrible storm only to bump into the person who will become the love of their life. There are declarations of love, perhaps none more famous than that of The Notebook where the rain loudly echoes off the lake water as the two protagonists scream out their confessions of love.

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Setting a scene amidst the pouring rain can create an extra layer of drama. Your protagonist is cold and soaked and uncomfortable, but they’re still out there because what is happening in the scene is so important that they don’t care. Because of both this character motivation layer combined with an audience’s previous experience with these scenes, setting a scene in the rain can give it some extra drama combined with a truly stunning visual for your readers.

What would the protagonist of your novel be doing out in the rain? Did they undergo an insurmountable loss, run out into the rain, kneel down, and let out an earth-shattering scream? Did they get caught in the rain on their way 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home from a party, walking 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home in the darkened wet streets, the sound of rain pounding loud against their ears, and they have the eerie feeling that they’re being watched… being followed… are they?

A ‘getting caught in the rain’ scene can be molded to fit any genre and to match virtually any character or situation.

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Writing Prompt: Either make up a new character or choose a character from your manuscript. Write a scene where the character gets caught in the rain. What important event happens to them while they’re caught in the rain? Make sure the event matches both the genre and character about whom you’re writing. Finally, how does the character change or grow based on what happens in this scene?

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Spotlight: Timothy Horne /-spotlight-timothy-horne/ Thu, 25 Mar 2021 14:00:52 +0000 /?p=4591 Name: Timothy Horne 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟hometown: Shamokin, PA Book Title: Detective Davis and the Swamp Bandits Genre: Mystery/Adventure Dorrance Publishing (DP): Describe your book in 10 words or less. Timothy Horne (TH):… Spotlight: Timothy Horne

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Dorrance Publishing  Spotlight Timothy Horne 1Name: Timothy Horne

虚拟币合约平台_虚拟hometown: Shamokin, PA

Book Title: Detective Davis and the Swamp Bandits

Genre: Mystery/Adventure

Dorrance Publishing (DP): Describe your book in 10 words or less.

Timothy Horne (TH): It’s about a group of detectives who solve a robbery.

DP: What made you want to write your book?

TH: I had written poems in the past and thought it would be exciting to write a book.

DP: How long did it take you to write your book?

TH: It took me about 8 months.

DP: How do you choose the names of your characters?

TH: All of my characters’ names are random.

DP: What do you do when you have writer’s block?   

TH: I think about different ways the chapter can end.

DP: What was your favorite chapter (or part) to write and why?

TH: I think the last chapter was my favorite part of the book because it really brought the story together.

DP: If you were stuck on an island and had to have one person from each category with you, who would they be and why:

a. One character from your book:

TH: I think I would choose Detective Davis because he is the main character.

b. One fictional character:

TH: I would pick Gibbs from NCIS.

c. One famous person (living or dead):

TH: I would choose Jesus.

DP: Besides writing, what are your other interests?

TH: I also collect coins.

DP: Do you keep a journal?

TH: No, I don’t keep a journal.

DP: How did you celebrate the publishing of your book?

TH: I celebrated with my family.

DP: If your book was made into a movie, who would play the main characters?

TH: I think Will Estes would be a good fit for Detective Davis.

DP: What did you enjoy most about working with Dorrance Publishing?

TH: I enjoyed getting to see my book develop.

DP: Five favorite books of all time?

TH: 1) The Bible 2) The 39 Clues 3) The Chronicles of Narnia 4) Mere Christianity 5) The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe

DP: One sentence of advice for other writers:

TH: Never give up on your ideas if they don’t seem to be coming together right now.

Are you ready to publish your book? Contact us today!

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Show Don’t Tell: Happiness /show-dont-tell-happiness/ Mon, 22 Mar 2021 15:00:32 +0000 /?p=4576 Happiness is such an elusive and complicated word. And showing a character experiencing happiness can be all the more complex, especially when you need to do it through showing rather… Show Don’t Tell: Happiness

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Happiness is such an elusive and complicated word. And showing a character experiencing happiness can be all the more complex, especially when you need to do it through showing rather than telling the reader. Within the idea of happiness, there are a few different types into which it can be broken down. Some types of happiness we experience are more fleeting while others have more longevity. Some involve more outward expressiveness while others are more subtle and internal. Examining the different types of happiness and how they can be expressed through mannerisms, action, and dialogue will allow you to write this emotion by showing it to your readers.

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1) Excitement

The type of happiness we call excitement can be expressed in many ways by a character. Rather than stating in the narrative “[insert character name here] is feeling excited”, have them rush into the next scene out of breath, tripping and falling all over themselves. They have a huge grin plastered on their face as they attempt to catch their breath so they can tell their friend the good news. As they share the details of their excitement, they’re jumping up and down with glee or clapping their hands together. They may even pull their friend into a spontaneous hug while they’re in the middle of speaking or do a flip by kicking off a nearby wall (if they’re more of the athletic type). Think about when you feel excited about something, how you have all of this excess adrenaline and energy that you don’t know what to do with. Find a way for your character to display those feelings in a way that fits best with their character’s personality.

2) Contentment

Another type of happiness that a character can express is contentment. This is a much less energetic version than that of excitement, but there is also potentially more longevity in this version. Contentment involves a character being happy overall with what their life looks like currently in the story. You can have a character who works to get to the point of contentment or a character who starts content, only to have it ripped away from them. But, sadly, a character arc can’t occur if a character is left in this state for the entire story.

When you’re showing the reader that a character is content, it’s important to use mannerisms, dialogue, and action to do so. For example, having a character wistfully smiling to themselves and, when another character asks why they’re smiling, having them say something along the lines of “I don’t know… just happy I guess.” Having them go out of their way to do something nice for another character just because they want to is another way to show that this character is in a good place with their life. Having them give their friends speeches on how much they appreciate them, take up new hobbies, walk with a certain pep in their step, or participate more actively in their life (talking more in meetings, raising their hand more in class, etc.) can also be ways to show overall life contentment and acceptance in a character.

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3) Optimism

Optimism could come from a character who is currently experiencing hardships or it could be a character in your story who is constantly looking on the bright side of any situation. And optimism within the story can either be written as positive or negative, this person is either a beacon of hope or a naive fool. The positive optimist will provide comfort to those around them, always knowing the right thing to say or do to make others feel better. And, if they’re being optimistic about themselves, they will walk around with an air of hope. On the other hand, the negative side of optimism would have this person written as fairly annoying. They will say some vague inspirational quote in the face of a person’s real struggles, telling them to “Look on the bright side…” as though that will magically make that person feel better.

Regardless of whether the portrayal is negative or positive, optimism can be shown in various ways. It can be expressed through dialogue, like a character saying any variation of “Well, at least…” or “Don’t worry, everything will work out!” It can be expressed through action, a person signing another person up for the talent show having the optimistic viewpoint that they’d win. A person going through some hardships and having one good thing happen, giving them the sudden hope that it’s all going to turn around for them. They begin walking around with their head held higher, a new spring in their step, making conversation with someone at the grocery store or starting back up on some of their favorite old hobbies.

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4) Joy

This is likely the most unbridled version of happiness and is typically connected to something specific. So whereas contentment is a state of being, joy is something a character will experience based on an event that happened to them. And it is a very heightened sensation so it will be a big event that causes it. A character landing their dream job, the love of their life confesses their feelings for them, they take their dream trip, they become a parent… something as big as joy should connect to a big life event.

And since the feeling of joy is such a heightened version of happiness, how it is expressed should be heightened as well. Your character starts dancing with a stranger in the street or singing to themselves in the middle of a crowded elevator without realizing it. They call a person they haven’t spoken to in years just to say they miss them. They go to the rooftop of their apartment building and let out an ear-shattering scream of pure happiness. There are many ways to express an emotion as complex as joy without explicitly telling the reader.

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Writing Prompt: Fan Fiction /writing-prompt-fan-fiction/ Fri, 12 Mar 2021 16:41:19 +0000 /?p=4567 When people typically think of fanfiction, they don’t initially think of renowned works of literature. But many popular novels started out as fanfiction, including Twilight, Fifty Shades of Grey, Mortal… Writing Prompt: Fan Fiction

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When people typically think of fanfiction, they don’t initially think of renowned works of literature. But many popular novels started out as fanfiction, including Twilight, Fifty Shades of Grey, Mortal Instruments, etc. In addition, even more s write fanfiction separately from their writing including Meg Cabot, of The Princess Diaries, Marissa Meyer, of The Lunar Chronicles, and more. This is because fanfiction can be an excellent way to practice and perfect certain areas of your writing. Although it is a medium often gets a bad rap, writing fanfiction can actually be a great writing exercise.

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Writer’s Block

If you’re just starting out with novel writing or you’re going through a particularly bad period of writer’s block, writing some fanfiction can be a great way to help your writing. You’re already writing within a pre-existing world with characters that have already been developed for you, so it gives you the chance to experiment and have fun. You don’t have to do all of this work into exposition and character-building, instead you can just jump right in and write a scene with a few of your favorite characters. Or write out a story that was mentioned as a character’s backstory, but that we never got to see within the events of the story. Writing in this uninhibited way can be a great way to regain some confidence in your prose while having some fun with your writing.

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Characterization

Another benefit of doing a fan fiction writing exercise is that it allows you to practice characterization without having to build characters from the ground up. You may think it will be easy to write characters that already exist, but there’s actually a challenge in living up to the original source material. Recreating each character’s unique voice, thoughts, mannerisms, etc. so that they match the character that they’re based on is a challenge in and of itself. And, because you won’t need to actually create the characters, you can simply focus on the challenge of capturing their essence in your writing. This is incredibly useful since this is a skill set you need when you write your own characters as well.

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The Rules

When it comes to fanfiction, you’re writing again within a world that already exists. This presents the unique opportunity for a writer to practice adhering to the ‘rules’ of a certain world without having to develop the concepts themselves. Every world that people write within has a certain set of rules or things that are possible vs. impossible. Writing fanfiction, utilizing a world with a set of rules that already exist, allows you to work on making sure the rules stay consistent and present within the story. Again, this is an important skill set to have when you develop your own world with its own rules, so this provides a unique opportunity to practice this in your writing.

Writing Prompts: 

a) Choose a movie with a rich world and/or set of characters. Write a scene that was mentioned in the movie, but never actually shown.

b) Choose one of your favorite television shows. Write a story or scene from the point of view of one of the side characters. Have the scene act as an explanation for a choice that the character made within the show.

c) Choose one of your favorite novels. Write a story or scene from the point of view of the antagonist of the story. Make sure to keep the characterization consistent and that the scene ties into the events of the novel in some way.

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Locations to Literature: Whitby /locations-to-literature-whitby/ Fri, 05 Mar 2021 16:28:45 +0000 /?p=4550 At this point, the character Dracula has transcended the original Bram Stoker novel. Not only has the character made appearances in movies, television, and books outside of the original novel’s… Locations to Literature: Whitby

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At this point, the character Dracula has transcended the original Bram Stoker novel. Not only has the character made appearances in movies, television, and books outside of the original novel’s context, but Stoker’s vampiric creation has served as an inspiration for horror creators and vampire lore throughout the history of popular culture. But how was this inspired to create such a compelling story and figure in literary history?

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It may surprise you to learn that this dark gothic novel started with what amounts to a summer vacation. Bram Stoker took a month-long trip between the month of July and August of 1890 to Whitby. At the time, he worked as the business manager for one of the most famous actors at the time, Henry Irving. Stoker and Irving reportedly had a complicated relationship, one which involved long talks that persisted until dawn as the actor attempted to decompress after a show. It is said that these talks and Irving himself could have provided partial inspiration for the character Dracula. It was actually Irving who recommended a stay at Whitby to Stoker, as he had once run a circus there.

During his stay at Whitby, Stoker lived at 6 Royal Crescent on West Cliff. After a week he was joined by his wife and young son and while it became a family vacation in part, Stoker spent much of his time taking long walks alone along the cliffs and researching his current novel. It was on his walks that Stoker discovered Whitby Abbey, the ruin of a Benedictine monastery founded in the 11th century. The gothic and ruinous nature of the structure inspired the Whitby Abbey described in the famous novel by the character Mina Murray.

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Stoker also spent a lot of time at St. Mary’s graveyard, which overlooks the town. At the time, many graves were eroding from the weather on the cliff edge and some were merely headstones marking the empty graves of those lost at sea. He used this area to mark down inscriptions and names for later use, including ‘Swales’ which became Dracula’s first victim at Whitby. He also met some retired seafarers there who gave him a taste of some of the local lore, which is said to have inspired some of the lighter moments in the novel.

On August 8th, 1890, stoker walked to the public library which was at the Coffee House End of the Quay. It was there that he discovered a book titled An Account of the Principalities of Wallachia and Moldovia by William Wilkinson. Wilkinson’s history mentioned a 15th-century prince named Vlad Tepes who impaled his enemies using wooden stakes. He was known as ‘Dracula’, which in the Wallachian language means ‘devil’. You can probably guess how this inspired Stoker, right?

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In addition, while staying at Whitby, Stoker heard of a shipwreck that had taken place five years earlier of a Russian vessel called the Dmitry from Narva. The ship ran aground on Tate Hill just below East Cliff. With a slightly rearranged name, the Dmitry from Narva became the Demeter from Varna which carried Dracula to Whitby.

Although Stoker went on to research for six additional years, learning the intricacies of the lands and customs of Transylvania, the original inspiration for much of Dracula came from Whitby. After a test performance as a play called The Undead, the changed formats after lead actor Henry Irving said he never wanted to see it again. The novel Dracula was published in 1897 and went on to become one of the world’s most well-known and acclaimed classic horror novels.

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Spotlight: Mark Chartrand /-spotlight-mark-chartrand/ Thu, 25 Feb 2021 15:00:17 +0000 /?p=4541 Name: Mark Chartrand 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟hometown: St. Louis, Missouri Book Title: A Dog Named Chilli: My New 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home Genre: Children’s/Fiction Dorrance Publishing (DP): Describe your book in 10 words or less. Mark… Spotlight: Mark Chartrand

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Dorrance Publishing  Spotlight Mark Chartrand 1Name: Mark Chartrand

虚拟币合约平台_虚拟hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

Book Title: A Dog Named Chilli: My New 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home

Genre: Children’s/Fiction

Dorrance Publishing (DP): Describe your book in 10 words or less.

Mark Chartrand (MC): Life lessons wrapped up in adventure for young readers.

DP: What made you want to write your book?

MC: My dog Chilli was the reason I wrote the book. It’s a fictional story of course but, at the time I adopted him from the APA of St. Louis I was dealing with a lot of issues in my life due to some poor choices I made. The outcome of those choices landed me in prison taking me away from everyone I loved, including my dog Chilli. I had plenty of time to think about my mistakes. During that time, I thought about Chilli’s life and what he endured before he was rescued, and I brought him 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home. I guess you could say we rescued each other.

DP: How long did it take you to write your book?

MC: I wrote “A Dog Named Chilli: My New 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home” in six weeks. The story came to me as I loosely based the characters Chilli encounters on situations I found myself in at different stages of my life. The most important lesson I want young readers to take away from the book is to make good choices in life. Learn how to work with others who are different from you. Try not to judge someone before you get to know them. Be confident and believe in yourself. Stand up for your friends to bullies. Be sure to think things through before you make a decision, as those decisions could dictate the kind of life you will lead.

DP: How do you choose the names of your characters?

MC: I chose the names of my characters for this book after family, friends, characters from my favorite T.V. shows and movies as well as pets I had growing up.

DP: What do you do when you have writer’s block?   

MC: When I get writer’s block, I write in my journal. I write about my day. I find that when I do this and distract my mind from the story it helps me get past my block.

DP: What was your favorite chapter (or part) to write and why?

MC: Chapter four in the book is my favorite. It’s one of the first lessons that Chilli figures out when it comes to judging people. Chilli’s first impression of Gary’s character is that he’s a mean, grumpy old man. By the time the readers get to this part of the book with Chilli, they see that Gary isn’t a mean person. He’s just sad as he is dealing with the recent loss of a loved one. Chilli see’s the sadness in Gary’s eyes and realizes that he passed judgment on Gary before he got to know him. The line in this part of the story where Chilli talks about Gary’s laughter and how it makes you feel good to be in its presence is definitely one of my prouder moments as a writer.

DP: If you were stuck on an island and had to have one person from each category with you, who would they be and why:

a. One character from your book:

MC: The Character from my book that I would want to be stuck on an island with is Chilli. The reason why is simple: he is truly my best buddy and we would have a lot of fun!

b. One fictional character:

MC: The fictional character that I would want to be stuck on an island with would be Mickey Haller from the Michael Connelly Novel “The Lincoln Lawyer”. The reason why is, given some of my life experience, Mickey Haller being the type of Lawyer he portrays in Connelly’s novels would lead to some great conversations about the moral dilemmas of determining what is right and wrong in the eyes of the law. Then having to defend that position.

c. One famous person (living or dead):

MC: The famous person I would want to be stuck on an island with would be Paul Newman. The reason why is his character portrayals in the movies “Color of Money” and “Nobody’s Fool” reminds me of a combination of both my Grandfathers. For different reasons, but they were both important to me in my life. I miss them both very much.

DP: Besides writing, what are your other interests?

MC: Other than writing, I love St. Louis Cardinal Baseball. One of the books I wrote that will be out soon titled “Out of Play” is based on the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs rivalry. Even though he is a grown man, I love hanging out and doing things with my son Cohl. I really enjoy going to concerts or live music performances. One of my greatest memories of a live performance was seeing B.B. King on Beale Street in Memphis. I’m an avid moviegoer. I enjoy working out, camping, float trips, anything that has to do with the ocean, and of course going on rides with my best buddy, my dog Chilli!

DP: Do you keep a journal?

MC: I do keep a journal. I do that to help keep my story ideas for upcoming projects in order. I also use it for the current books I am working on when an idea for a storyline pops into my head.

DP: How did you celebrate the publishing of your book?

MC: I made a pizza and read my book reliving the story I created about Chilli and all his friends. Then I called my mom and all those who stood by me as I’ve been on this journey at this stage of my life to get their thoughts on the final product. I sensed a little bias, but they all said they loved it!

DP: If your book was made into a movie, who would play the main characters?

MC: If this book were made into a movie, I would like to see Ryan Reynolds play Chilli. Charlie Day play Hercules, Kevin Hart to play Lucky, Zac Efron to play Thomas, Christian Bale would play Higgins, Hugh Grant would play Elton, Joe Pesche and Robert Deniro to play the Farillo Brothers, Samuel L. Jackson would play Razor, Bradley Cooper would play Carl, Charlie Sheen would play Bandit, Vince Vaughn would play Harry, and Charlize Theron would play Rose… I’d be lying if I hadn’t given this some thought (wink, wink Hollywood)! I think this group of talented actors would make a great movie!

DP: What did you enjoy most about working with Dorrance Publishing?

MC: What I enjoyed the most about my working with Dorrance Publishing was the encouragement I got from the beginning when I submitted my manuscript. Barb Ennis and Sandi Kruse were instrumental in helping bring this story to life. I’m very grateful for all their help and feedback during this process.

DP: Five favorite books of all time?

MC: My five favorite books of all time are:

1) ” Empire Falls ” by Richard Russo

2) ” The Life We Bury ” by Allen Eskens

3) ” Paper Boats ” by Thao Lam

4) ” The Stand ” by Stephen King

5) Anything written by ’s Michael Connelly, and David Baldacci

DP: One sentence of advice for other writers:

MC: The advice I would give to any writer would be “Don’t take yourself too seriously we all have a story or stories to tell, so just write about them!”

Are you ready to publish your book? Contact us today!

A Dog Named Chilli: My New 虚拟币合约平台_虚拟home

Dorrance Publishing  Spotlight Mark Chartrand 2

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How to Write a ‘Based on a True Story’ Book /how-to-write-a-based-on-a-true-story-book/ Thu, 18 Feb 2021 15:00:04 +0000 /?p=4512 There is a very big difference between a biography, autobiography, memoir, etc., and a ‘based on a true story’ book. The goal of books in the first category is to… How to Write a ‘Based on a True Story’ Book

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There is a very big difference between a biography, autobiography, memoir, etc., and a ‘based on a true story’ book. The goal of books in the first category is to remain as factually accurate as possible in their telling. They are heavily researched, meticulously plotted according to real-world events, and rarely embellished. On the other hand, books that are ‘based’ or ‘inspired’ by a true story… well those are almost the exact opposite.

The statement itself implies that the person who wrote the book drew inspiration from a real-life event or person, but that the audience shouldn’t expect a factually accurate retelling of this event. This statement tells the reader that the is choosing to prioritize entertainment and good storytelling over staying true to events. Therefore, readers who are interested in these books go in with the expectation that they will be reading a novel that is both entertaining and masterfully plotted. So, if you’re taking on a ‘based on a true story’ novel, here are some tips.

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1) Keep the voice neutral

Whether you’re writing a ‘based on a true story’ book about something historical or something from personal experience, you need to remove your own voice from the narrative. You shouldn’t be portraying certain characters or events as right or wrong because readers can very quickly sense personal bias in a novel and, with that, you’ll lose their trust. They want to simply experience the events and have the freedom to make their own judgments about what occurred. So make sure you’re working hard to show the events to your readers rather than telling them how to think or feel about characters and situations.

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2) Be the Writer & Editor

This may sound like a writer’s worst nightmare at first, but it’s simpler than it seems. When it comes to the scope of the events that took place in the story, you’ll need to put on an editor’s hat and strategically think about where to cut down. If the event you’re writing about took place over the course of a day you likely won’t have to do this much, but if it took place over weeks or years there will likely be a lot to cut around in terms of scenes and events. As a general rule of thumb, if a scene doesn’t contain a character choice, feeling the effects of a character choice, or someone discovering the motivations behind a character choice, the scene will likely need to be cut.

Just as you may need to omit some scenes, it may benefit the story to combine or eliminate some characters from the story. Remember, since this is a ‘based on a true story’ book, you are allowed to take liberties and make it somewhat fictional. If you know only a few details about a character, perhaps combine them with another character to make them more well-rounded and also less confusing for the reader. If there was someone who was part of the story but didn’t play an integral role, perhaps they’ll need to be cut for the sake of having a well-paced novel.

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3) Make Additions Where Necessary

Just as you’ll need to cut events or characters who don’t serve the narrative, you may need to add motivations or events that make the story more exciting or narratively sound. Remember that, in the case of this type of novel, your goal is to tell a good story, not necessarily a true story. So if a character seemingly had a simple unexciting motivation for an action in a story, get creative and add a more complicated motivation that you feel would still make sense for their personality. If the real-life events don’t culminate in a necessarily satisfying way, add to the climax to give it more drama.

Many novels and films of this genre wind up creating stories that have very little to do with the real-life events by which they were inspired, but they created a good story nonetheless.

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Writing Prompt: Valentine’s Day /writing-prompt-valentines-day/ Thu, 11 Feb 2021 19:29:47 +0000 /?p=4518 For some people, Valentine’s day is a day to celebrate the love they have for their partner. It’s a day they look forward to, a day filled with candy hearts,… Writing Prompt: Valentine’s Day

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For some people, Valentine’s day is a day to celebrate the love they have for their partner. It’s a day they look forward to, a day filled with candy hearts, assorted chocolates, flowers, jewelry, and mushy declarations of love. It’s a day of extravagant dinners or a romantic camping trip or even a trip across the country. For others, it’s simply a day where the colors pink and red are shoved in their faces while mushy gushy couples surround them horror-movie-style. Between the two types of people, which one is your character most like?

Dorrance Publishing Writing Prompt Valentine's Day 1

How people choose to celebrate (or protest, quite frankly) Valentine’s Day can say a lot about them as a character. Perhaps your character is in a long-term relationship, but still refuses to celebrate the holiday remembering all the years that they hated it when they were single. Then maybe their partner chooses to celebrate it anyway, despite their wishes to the contrary. How would your character react?

On the other hand, perhaps it’s a day they look forward to all year and have extremely high expectations for. Will their partner live up to their Valentine’s Day expectations? If they fall short, will it cause some tension with the couple? Is their partner being lazy or are their expectations too unreasonably high?

Then you have the people who are single on Valentine’s Day. Does the holiday make them sad or bitter, causing them to become irritable toward others for the duration of the day? Do they try to make the most of it, inviting some friends over to give themselves a little less traditional celebration? Or perhaps they even focus on self-love for the day, treating themselves to some chocolates, flowers, and maybe even a relaxing bubble bath?

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The world (especially when it’s fiction) has a way of surprising people or changing their minds as well. A character could wake up bitter on a day they hate and then a chance encounter could completely change their entire attitude. For example, perhaps your character wakes up Valentine’s morning feeling bitter and annoyed at the romanticism surrounding them. They head to their local coffee shop where they have a ‘meet-cute’ with someone to whom they’re attracted. They end up getting their number and agreeing to meet up later that week for dinner. Suddenly, what started out as one of their least favorite days has turned out kind of romantic for them. Will their new positive attitude hold up for the rest of the day? Or will the romantic bombardment be too much for them to stay chipper?

Writing Prompt: Take a character from your novel or a character you’ve recently created. Choose any year of their life and write about how they chose to celebrate Valentine’s Day that year. Show the reader how they feel about the holiday and their attitude for the day using the actions and plans they choose to make, dialogue, and mannerisms.

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